Graduate Teaching Fellows Mentoring Program

About the Program

The Graduate Teaching Fellows Program at Radford University provides graduate student instructors with a structured environment in which to build their teaching skills. Our collegial program shares teaching ideas, lesson plans, grading strategies, problems, and successes.

The GTA/F Program supports Radford University’s emphasis on pedagogy. Graduate Teaching Assistants and Fellows are assigned to an experienced English faculty member with whom they work closely in planning and teaching Core classes. This unique learning experience cannot be attained in conventional graduate courses.

Applicants should contact  Dr. Paul Witkowsky, English Graduate Program Coordinator, Dr. Amanda Kellogg, Assistant Graduate Recruitment Coordinator, or Dr. Frank Napolitano, GTF Program Coordinator. 

Stipends and Tuition Waivers

In-state first-year Graduate Teaching Assistants receive a full tuition waiver for 9 graduate credit hours (the typical course load) each semester and a $10,000 stipend per year.

In-state second-year GTFs receive a full tuition waiver for 9 graduate credit hours (the typical course load) each semester and an $11,000 stipend per year.

The program offers a limited number of full tuition waivers and stipends for out-of-state students.

Mentoring Program Spotlight

August 2016

Welcome, new Graduate Teaching Assistants!

The Mentoring Program would like to welcome Emily Deacon, Andy Geels, Jessica Mattox, and Marti Williams. We're so excited to have them on board, and we know that they're going to do great things in their teaching teams.

Picture of New Graduate Teaching Assistants Emily Deacon, Andy Geels, Jessica Mattox, and Marti Williams

From left to right: new Graduate Teaching Assistants Jessica Mattox, Marti Williams, Emily Deacon, and Andy Geels.

Summer 2016

We're so proud of the Graduate Teaching Fellows who represented Radford University at professional conferences this summer!

Two GTFs presented at The 1816 Conference: Creativity and Turmoil, at the University of Sheffield, England. Melanie Graham (M.A. '16) presented "'Watch Out, Boys, She'll Chew You Up': Percy Shelly's Ambivalence at Beatrice Cenci," on June 27, and Catelin Turman (M.A. '17) presented  "Partly from Curiosity, and Partly from Idleness: the Monstrosity of Emma Woodhouse and Victor Frankenstein," on June 25.

Caitlyn Parker (M.A. '17) and Kelly Nickell (M.A. '17) participated in Feminist Camp, a week-long workshop in New York City, from June 6-10. Caitlyn and Kelly were two of fourteen people chosen to spend the week with authors Jennifer Baumbardner and Amy Richards. They held internships, volunteered for Sancturary for Families, and held meetings with various non-profit organizations working for women's issues nationally. 

Three of our Graduate Teaching Fellows presented papers at the HERA (Humanities Education and Research Association) conference on March 25th, in New Orleans. Kelly Nickell (M.A. '17) presented "A Woman Without A Movement: The Bell Jar as Proto-Feminist Intervention," Caitlyn Parker (M.A. '17) presented "'A Point of Resistance': Discourse as Constraint and Empowerment in Alison Bechdel's Fun Home," and Phelan Tinsley (M.A. '17) presented "'Queers Aren't Meant to Love': 1950s-1980s Discourses on Homosexuality and the Counter-Discourse of Gay Love in Sherman's Bent and Newman's 'A Letter to Harvey Milk.'"

Photograph of Phelan Tinsley, Caitlyn Parker, Dr. Moira Baker, and Kelly Nickell

From left to right: Phelan Tinsley, Caitlyn Parker, Dr. Moira Baker, and Kelly Nickell, at the HERA (Humanities Education and Research Association) Conference on March 25th, 2016.