Current Students

SECOND YEAR STUDENTS

Doug Buchanan (djbuchanan@radford.edu) earned his undergraduate degree in Psychology at Radford University in 2014. During his time at Radford, Doug conducted research on protective/risk factors for adolescents using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health study). He helped create two posters, one of which was presented at the Counseling Psychology Conference in Atlanta. During his first year, Doug worked with Dr. Means-Christensen on research pertaining to infertility and exercise motivation. Currently he is interning at the Mount Rogers Community Service Board in Wytheville. He is working in the new RAPID ACCESS program that targets lower SES individuals and allows them to be seen for an intake on the same day that they show up. After graduation, Doug hopes to enter a doctoral program and eventually work with wide ranging degrees of depression as well as substance abuse.

Anastasia Formica (aformica@radford.edu) earned her undergraduate degree in Psychology with a minor in English at Iona College in 2014, where she had the opportunity to work at a Marriage and Family Counseling Clinic. She also had the opportunity to work on her own research project studying the impact of commonly held stereotypes concerning deviant subcultures on the jury decision making process, which she presented at the 2014 NCUR conference in Kentucky. During her first year in the program at Radford, she completed her 2-semester Research Mentorship with Dr. Dayna Hayes on a project examining the differences in neurogenesis between two different strains of rats and rat gender. Now in her second year, Anastasia is extending her project on neurogenesis in order to complete her thesis under the continued guidance of Dr. Hayes. She is also completing her 2-semester internship at a local assisted living facility for patients suffering from a traumatic brain injury (TBI). She will be working closely with the patients there as part of their rehabilitation with the ultimate goal of once again being able to live independently. After graduation, Anastasia hopes to enter a doctoral program and eventually continue working with the TBI population.

Emily Keller (ekeller@radford.edu) earned her Bachelor of Science degree majoring in both Psychology and Justice Studies with a concentration in Criminal Justice from James Madison University (JMU) in 2013. During her time as an honors student at JMU, she served as a teaching assistant for two psychology classes, tutored a student in a program serving children “at-risk” for child abuse and neglect, and volunteered as a student helper at an assisted living center. In addition, Emily spent a semester as an editing assistant for a book chronicling the criminalization of mental illness, where she conducted literature searches, proofread content, and edited chapters. She also designed and executed a study concerning the analysis of violent content in popular video games that might affect pathological gamers, which culminated in the completion of her undergraduate honors thesis. In her first year of graduate school at Radford University, Emily served as a teaching assistant for Dr. Jackson’s Statistics and Research Methods classes and as a research assistant for Dr. Pierce.  She also worked with Dr. Riding-Malon investigating issues surrounding trauma in rural populations and has submitted a manuscript that is currently under review for publication in an academic journal. Now in her second year in the Clinical-Counseling Program at Radford, Emily is continuing this research effort with Dr. Riding-Malon. As a component of her clinical education, Emily is interning for two semesters at a local state hospital that offers acute psychiatric treatment. Through her assistantship as a Graduate Teaching Fellow, Emily is teaching two undergraduate sections of Introduction to Psychology in both the Fall and Spring semesters. She hopes to enter a Clinical or Counseling Psychology doctoral program after receiving her master’s degree from Radford.

Abby Vandivier (avandivier@radford.edu) earned her undergraduate degree in Psychology with a minor in statistics at Virginia Tech in 2014. While there, she participated in multiple research projects at the Child Study Center entering data, observing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Oppositional Defiant Disorder, and conducting research sessions exploring parental transfer of anxiety to children. During her first year in the Clinical-Counseling Program at Radford University, Abby completed her 2-semester Applied Training in Psychological Research Course working with Dr. Aspelmeier on a project examining the role of self-regulation in adult-romantic attachment styles. She presented the research at the 61st Annual South Eastern Psychological Association Meeting and at the 2015 Student Engagement Forum at Radford University. Abby also obtained a research fellowship her second semester to work on a meta-analysis with Dr. Aspelmeier examining academic outcomes for first-generational college students. During her second year at the program, Abby is working as a Graduate Assistant while writing her thesis which will examine attachment style and interpersonal violence using polyvictimization as a moderator. She is also completing her year-long internship at a regional hospital working with both adults and adolescents who are experiencing severe pathology. After graduation, she hopes to enter a doctoral program and eventually work with patients and conduct research in a research hospital setting.

Lora Wagner (lwagner2@radford.edu) earned her undergraduate degrees at Radford University majoring in Psychology and Criminal Justice with a minor in French. During her time at Radford she was able to complete research with the Criminal Justice and Psychology departments with Dr. Isaac Van Patten and Dr. Ann Elliott examining the association between childhood victimization, poly-victimization, and psychological distress in incarcerated women. Lora was also able to assist in further research with Dr. Elliott examining childhood victimization, poly-victimization and psychological distress in college students. During her first year in the Clinical-Counseling Program at Radford University, Lora completed her 2-semester Applied Training in Psychological Research Course continuing her previous research with Dr. Elliott on the study of incarcerated women. This research was presented at the 61st Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, as well as the 2015 Student Engagement Forum at Radford University. Lora was also a teaching assistant for Dr. Hayes’ Analysis of Psychological Data and Research Methods classes. During her second year in our program, Lora is serving as a Graduate Teaching Fellow and is teaching two sections of the Introductory Psychology course during the Fall and Spring semesters. Additionally, she is completing her 2-semester internship at a community-based jail diversion program. She is working with individuals who have a mental illness and are involved in the criminal justice system. After graduation, she hopes to enter a doctoral program and eventually work as a forensic psychologist.

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

Alyson Faires (afaires@email.radford.edu) earned her undergraduate degree in Psychology in 2013 at the University of Southern Maine (USM). During her time at USM, Alyson served as a teaching assistant, a statistics tutor and she also had the opportunity to work on a couple different research projects. She helped create and present four research posters including a poster on hypercompetitiveness and its link to cosmetic surgery that was presented at the Eastern Psychological Association (2014). Alyson also helped with a poster on cell phone interference with attention and task performance that won Best Student Poster at the Maine Psychological Association (2013). The research Alyson collaborated on regarding the “mere presence” effect of the cell phone also led to a publication in the journal Social Psychology. During her first year in the Clinical-Counseling Program at Radford University, Alyson is completing her 2-semester Applied Training in Psychological Research Course working with Dr. Elliott on a project examining victimization and family environment in incarcerated women. She is also serving as a 20 hour graduate teaching assistant for Dr. Jackson’s class in Analysis of Psychological Data. After graduation Alyson hopes to enter a doctoral program and eventually work toward prison reformation.

Sarah Falkowitz (sfalkowitz@radford.edu) earned her undergraduate degree in Psychology at Slippery Rock University in 2015. During her time at SRU she had the opportunity to work on a research project that examined children’s self-perceptions, theory of mind, and prosocial behavior. She co-authored a four posters on this project, which were presented at various conferences, including the Cognitive Development Society conference in Memphis. Sarah also complete an internship at a domestic violence shelter where she interacted with residents and answered hotline phone calls. During her first year in the Clinical-Counseling Program at Radford, Sarah is completing her 2-semester Applied Training in Psychological Research Course working with Dr. Townsend on a project that examines autism in rural areas. In addition to her school work, Sarah is also working 20 hours a week with Dr. Mabry, as a research assistant, and Dr. Biermeier-Hanson, as a teaching assistant. After graduation, she hopes to enter a doctoral program and eventually work children in private practice.

Frank Griffey (fgriffey@radford.edu) earned his undergraduate degree from Radford University in May of 2015. During his undergraduate education, Frank interned at South Western Virginia Mental Health Institute (SWVMHI) located in Marion, Virginia. There, he observed the role of the judicial system within a state psychiatric hospital, the role of treatment teams in patient care, and the administration of patient therapy. For his first year research mentorship, Frank is assisting Dr. Hayes and her research team with various research projects in the rat lab. These projects include: the differences in neurogenesis of two different breeds of rats as well as gender, and the presence of stress in rats after alcohol and nicotine exposure. After graduation, Frank hopes to attend a doctoral program to later work with low income rural communities.

Kamille Harris (kharris102@email.radford.edu) obtained her undergraduate degree in Psychology from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in 2014, where she graduated summa cum laude.  During her time there, she assisted in a research study that investigated how sexual health messages were perceived by African-American College Students. She conducted focus groups to gather data and presented the results with the other research assistants at the North Carolina Psychological Foundation Poster Session. She also joined a mentorship program while in Greensboro, North Carolina which allowed her to mentor a local girl in the area and assist with her overall growth and educational advancement. During her first year in the Clinical-Counseling Program at Radford University, Kamille is completing her two-semester Applied Training in Psychological Research course with Dr. Riding-Malon examining how spiritual leaders in rural areas offer support to those in the community suffering from complex trauma. She will also be serving as a 20 hour graduate assistant for a 400-level lab class in I/O Psychology with Dr. Petersen and assisting Dr. Jackson with a 300-level data analysis class.  After graduation, Kamille plans to earn her Psy.D in Clinical Psychology and work with trauma victims, particularly those suffering from PTSD and/or the aftermath of domestic abuse.