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Art 437

ART 437: Technology, Art, and Vision

Credit Hours: (3)

Throughout history artists have explored the technological, philosophical, and scientific advancements of their age to create new ways of seeing and perceiving. This course explores how artists experiment with new technologies to challenge our perceptions of reality, question the role technology plays in our society as well as explore new methods and theories of image making.

 

Detailed Description of Course

Throughout history artists have explored the technological, philosophical, and scientific advancements of their age to create new ways of seeing and perceiving This course explores how artists experiment with new technologies to challenge our perceptions of reality, question the role technology plays in our society as well as explore new methods and theories of image making. The invention of pictorial perspective revolutionized the way we see the cosmos and our human relationship to it. The invention of photography in the 19th century offered painters new ways to break with Renaissance reality while the camera created new images for inner/outer reflection. Muybridge's experiments in motion and the invention of film opened up a new awareness of a world in constant change. The artist no longer had to rely on the implied motion of the still canvas/sculpture. Literal motion could be speeded up or slowed down revealing nuances never before seen. As media technologies advanced, artists continued to use them as tools of expression. Animated images, projections, live action film and video appeared in the gallery setting. Today the technological skills that once separated different media are now merging into a common digital format, the computer. Artists are exploring the new perspectives offered by the digital computer. Yet no tool is neutral. It carries imbedded within it unique symbol systems that profoundly affect our perceptions of reality.

 

Detailed Description of Conduct of Course

The course will involve lectures with visual aids using video, DVD and power point presentations of artwork. The video series of James Burk’s, “The Day the Universe Changed” will form the historical background of some of the lectures. Students will apply historical examples to analyze how today’s technology influences vision and art. Artwork of various technological sources including film, video, and digital works will be presented and discussed. Hand outs from various sources involving psychology, media studies, technology, and art history will be discussed in groups and applied to present day art using new technologies and insights.

 

Student Goals and Objectives of the Course

Students taking this course will first study historical examples where artists explored the technological, philosophical, and scientific advancements of their age to create new ways of seeing and perceiving. Students will come to understand how artists experiment with new technologies to challenge our perceptions of reality, question the role technology plays in our society as well as explore new methods and theories of image making.

Students will then apply the methods of analysis used in the historical examples to digital/film/video works made by artists in more recent times. The methods of analysis involves discourse in symbol systems, Gestalt psychology, media theories, as well as theories of art and aesthetics. Students will also come to understand and appreciate experimental artworks in digital, film, video and animation.

 

Assessment Measures

  • Attendance
  • Students will be assessed by class participation, tests on the material, and projects that apply concepts learned.

 

Other Course Information

None