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Tripled Rooms

About Extended Housing and Triples

All incoming freshmen who apply to live on-campus by application deadlines are guaranteed housing. However, because of the heavy demand for on-campus housing, it is necessary for the University to initially assign some students to extended housing (triples). Assignment in a tripled room is intended to be a temporary arrangement. Students in tripled rooms will be offered a permanent space based on availability within the building and the student’s priority (based on deposit date) as soon as permanent spaces are identified.

We consider all three students in a tripled room as permanent residents, so no one student is regarded as the "extra" person. Historically, most students assigned to an extended housing room are offered a permanent space before the end of the Fall Semester.  However, there have been years when we have ended the Fall semester with students still in triple rooms.

Financial Rebate

Students who are tripled will each receive a 25% discount off the cost of their room for each week that they are in a temporary triple.  This credit is posted to each student’s account at the end of the semester.

Resources

In an effort to assist tripled students through this experience, they will receive information with their room assignment before arriving on campus. Students will be given detailed information about what to expect as part of a tripled room, applicable rebates, furniture removal if one person moves, and how to get along with multiple roommates.  Certain programming within the residence halls is tailored for students living in extended housing.  This programming is designed to take a proactive approach, with in-hall activities that support and educate residents on how to maximize their extended housing living experience.  In addition, Housing and Residential Life staff are always available to help mediate any issues that may arise.  Spaces have been identified in each of the buildings for “quiet study” to ensure that residents have a quiet, comfortable place to focus on their academics.

Living in a Triple and "De-tripling"

Housing and Residential Life staff in each building work with our assignments coordinator to facilitate the de-tripling process. As a result, it is important that tripled students keep in touch with their Resident Assistant, Resident Director, and Area Director if there are problems. Students in tripled rooms will be given priority for vacancies in the building where they reside.  Students may request to remain in their building or be assigned to another building if spaces are available. We use deposit date as the main factor in determining priority for the de-tripling process.

Frequently Asked Questions

Who's assigned to these rooms? Why were these students chosen?

Mostly freshmen. About one in every ten freshman students will be living in triples. These are the last rooms we assign, so the freshmen in these rooms are among the last new students confirmed by the University to receive on-campus housing (i.e., housing requested after early to mid-April). 

How long will I be assigned to a triple room?

Our first priority will be to get all students moved to a permanent space as soon as possible.  Unfortunately, we can only go as fast as when spaces become available.  Historically, most students assigned to an extended housing room are offered a permanent space before the end of the Fall Semester.  However, there have been years when we have ended the Fall semester with students in triple rooms.

What extra furniture is in a triple room?

There are three beds -- two of which are bunked -- two desks, and two chairs. All three roommates share the two wardrobes and dressers.  It is important that furniture is equally shared by all roommates. Resident Assistants can assist in determining the equal distribution of all furniture to ensure that all residents have fair access to the space.  No additional furniture is available for the room. Students are also welcome to request a bed loft.  Until de-tripled, we can only allow one loft per room.

Are there any restrictions on setting up my triple (or quad?)

Yes, furniture should remain on the floor. Elevating furniture on bricks or blocks, other furniture or other structures could lead to problems with stability and personal safety or damage to personal or University property.

Also for safety reasons, please:

  • Do not place beds on tops of dressers, desks, multiple layers of cinder blocks, any slippery surface or any type of structural support not provided by the University
  • Do not bring or construct lofts, partitions, or any other structure
  • Do not purchase or rent bed lofts
  • Do not bring cinder blocks
  • Do not use extension cords [instead of extension cords, bring UL/CSA approved power strips equipped with Integrated Circuit Breakers (over-current shut off protector)]
  • Do not block windows or heating convectors 

How will vacancies be offered?

Housing and Residential Life staff in each building works with our assignments coordinator to facilitate the de-tripling process. As a result, it is important that tripled students keep in touch with their Resident Assistant, Resident Director, and Area Director if there are problems. Students in tripled rooms will be given priority for vacancies in the building where they reside.  We use deposit date as the main factor in determining priority for the de-tripling process. 

Will the furniture be removed when one of the roommates is reassigned?

Yes. Staff will work as quickly as possible to remove the additional bed. 

Is one student designated to have the specific furniture?

All three roommates should talk about how to share the furniture and space. For example, one roommate may not like the top bunk. It is important that furniture is equally shared by all roommates. Resident Assistants can assist in determining the equal distribution of all furniture to ensure that all residents have fair access to the space.  Planning this in advance by talking with roommates will start your experience smoothly. Students with questions or concerns can speak with their Resident Assistant.

What should I do if I am the first person to arrive in the room?

As mentioned above, the extended furniture should be divided equally. No one student should have the advantage over his/her roommates. For example, one student should take the top bunk, and one student should share both closets and dressers. It is a good idea to wait until all roommates have arrived before beds and furniture are set up.

Can we move the furniture around?

Most of the furniture can be moved to suit the needs and creativity of the residents of that room, provided it does not block the path of egress in the room. Also, consider where the internet, electrical outlets, and cable connections are located when rearranging furniture. Students are also welcome to request a bed loft, and one bed loft per room will be allowed until the room has been permanently de-tripled.

Are there three Ethernet connections?

There are multiple Ethernet connections in all rooms and all of our residence halls are set up for wireless networking. In some rooms an extra-long Ethernet cable may be necessary. Since not all connections are in the same location, it is not possible to give all residents the exact locations of the connections. We have found that fewer and fewer students use an Ethernet connection as a wireless connection is readily available

Won't it be cramped in the room with all that furniture?

Room set-up will be tight, although the rooms were evaluated before their conversion to triples as to how well furnishings would fit in the available space. Storage space is limited to the closet or closets and under the beds. There are not storage rooms elsewhere on the floor or in the building.

Here are some creative, yet safe ways of arranging furnishings in order to save space and maximize the amount of open floor space:

  • Bring shelving units that stand on the floor or in the upper part of your closet
  • Bunk an unbunked bed or elevate it on hard plastic bed risers (no cinder blocks)
  • Make an 'L' formation with two beds, or dressers or desks
  • Use your refrigerator as a nightstand
  • Make use of all flat surfaces (tops of desks, dressers, refrigerators, etc.)
  • Bring storage drawers or boxes that fit under your bed (10" clearance if not elevated)
  • Move dresser or shelves into your closet
  • Hang a shoe organizer inside your closet

Each student should restrict the items he/she brings to campus, particularly by leaving least essential items (e.g., winter clothing) at home. A practical rule of thumb would be to restrict your possessions to what fits in/on your desk, dresser and one-third of a small closet. Hanging space for clothing will be particularly limited. Roommates are strongly encouraged to speak with one another prior to move-in day and to ensure that unnecessary duplications (e.g. TV, stereo, fan, refrigerator, curtains) are avoided. Families who travel to campus for move-in day should plan to take back home with them items such as empty trunks and suitcases. 

How will I be notified when my room is de-tripled?

All three students will be notified via email that there room is being de-tripled. The student who will be moving will coordinate the move to their permanent location with their Resident Director.

Can we decide to stay permanently tripled?

Yes!  Last year we had almost 30 rooms that decided to stay permanently tripled because they enjoyed living together.  All three roommates would need to sign a “permanent triple agreement” and return it to our office.  Students who form a permanent triple will continue to receive the room discount until all rooms for that gender have been de-tripled. 

I'm worried my grades might suffer because I've got these extra roommates. Does that happen to students in triples?

That does not happen in our experience at Radford University and not according to a number of national research studies done over the years. Per a review of six studies by John Foubert, the research has concluded that academic performance does not suffer when students are in tripled rooms and that grade point averages are no different for these students than for others in residence halls. Studies also show that being tripled does not affect students' adjustment to college life and that tripled students are as likely as others to participate in student organizations and to report satisfaction with their academic and social experiences. 

On the negative side, studies also show that tripled students are less satisfied with their living space, privacy and perceived control over room activity than are students in standard doubles. Tripled students are less satisfied with their roommates and spend less time in their rooms than do students in standard doubles.

Why isn't more housing being built at the University?

Radford University has been systematically renovating all of its current residence halls.  Renovations to Madison, Jefferson, Moffett, Washington, Pocahontas, and Bolling have been completed.  Renovations to Draper Hall start summer 2015.  Plans are being formulated to address potential renovations to Muse Hall following the completion of the Draper Hall project.  Each of these renovation projects have taken rooms off-line during construction periods.  Radford University is in the process of updating it facilities master plan to assess the need to build future housing and to explore other methods of adding more housing. 

What is the difference between a temporary triple and a three capacity room?

A triple is a temporary assignment where three people are living in a space that normally houses two people.  A three capacity room was designed and built for three residents.  A three capacity room is much larger, and is not part of the temporary housing.  Three capacity rooms do not get de-tripled.