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Psychology 630

PSYC 630: Cognitive and Affective Aspects of Behavior

Prerequisite:  Graduate standing or permission of the instructor

Credit Hours: (3)

This course will examine how and why people think and behave as they do. Current theoretical and empirical evidence from mainstream cognitive and affective perspectives, evolutionary psychology, and neuroscience will be examined and integrated. Applications to a variety of contexts will be explored.                                 

 

Detailed Description of Course

This course will examine how and why people think and behave as they do.  Current theoretical and empirical evidence from mainstream cognitive and affective perspectives, evolutionary psychology, and neuroscience will be examined and integrated.  Applications to a variety of contexts will be explored.

 

Detailed Description of Conduct of Course

I. Overview of Theoretical Approaches

            A.  Cognitive

             B.  Affective/motivational

             C.  Evolutionary Psychology

             D.  Neuroscience

             E.  Integration of Perspectives

II.  Topics

            A.  Attention

            B.  Memory

            C.  Problem Solving

            D.  Decision Making

III.  Individual Differences

              A.  Male/Female Differences

              B.  Developmental Considerations

              C.  Intellectual Level of Functioning

              D.  Disorders

IV.  Applications to Real World Contexts

              A.  Real World Decision Making

                        1.  Heuristic Decision Making

                        2.  Emotion and Decision Making

              B.  Effects of Drugs on Cognition, Affect, and Behavior

              C.  Applications to Counseling

This course will provide students with current theories and evidence concerning mental and behavioral functioning, and will connect laboratory studies with real-world applications in various contexts.  The course will require students to read scientific literature, write critically and creatively about the subject, engage in group discussion, and make class presentations.

 

Goals and Objectives of the Course 

At the end of this course the student should:

     1. Be able to identify and discuss different theoretical perspectives on human behavior, and develop an integrative framework which combines these perspectives in a logical and helpful way.

     2. Be able to apply their integrated framework to specific counseling situations.

     3. Be able to read and apply the relevant scientific literature to specific counseling contexts.

 

Assessment Measures

Students will be assessed on their class presentations, class discussion, and on their written assignments.  The most important of the written assignments will be either a theoretical-integrative paper or a paper applying the material of the course to a context chosen by the student and approved by the professor.

 

Other Course Information 

None

 

Review and Approval

April, 1995 Approved Alastair V.E. Harris

March, 1998 Reviewed Alastair V.E. Harris

Revised: March 10, 1999

Revised:  December 20, 2007

Revised:  November 25, 2008