Earth in the News

The latest reports of natural disasters and scientific discoveries about the Earth.

  • Rapid plankton growth in ocean seen as sign of carbon dioxide loading

    A microscopic marine alga is thriving in the North Atlantic to an extent that defies scientific predictions, suggesting swift environmental change as a result of increased carbon dioxide in the ocean.

  • Rapid plankton growth in ocean seen as sign of carbon dioxide loading

    A microscopic marine alga is thriving in the North Atlantic to an extent that defies scientific predictions, suggesting swift environmental change as a result of increased carbon dioxide in the ocean.

  • Can Paris pledges avert severe climate change?

    A new study shows that if the emission reductions pledges brought to Paris are implemented and followed by measures of equal or greater ambition, they have the potential to reduce the probability of the highest levels of warming, and increase the probability of limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius.

  • Remote lakes are affected by warming climate, research shows

    The rate of carbon burial in remote lakes has doubled over the last 100 years, researchers say, suggesting even isolated ecosystems are feeling the effects of our changing climate. 

  • Shedding light on oil behaviors before the next spill

    There are still critical research gaps hampering efforts to both assess the environmental impacts of crude oil spills and to effectively remediate them, a Canadian, comprehensive scientific report has concluded.

  • Volcanic rocks hold clues to Earth's interior

    Earth's deep interior transport system explains volcanic island lava complexities, report scientists. Studies of rocks found on certain volcanic islands, known as ocean island basalts, have revealed that although these erupted rocks originate from Earth's interior, they are not the same chemically.

  • Big data reveals glorious animation of bottom water

    A remarkably detailed animation of the movement of the densest and coldest water in the world around Antarctica has been produced using data generated on Australia's most powerful supercomputer, Raijin.

  • How Earth's Pacific plates collapsed

    Scientists drilling into the ocean floor have, for the first time, found out what happens when one tectonic plate first gets pushed under another. The international expedition drilled into the Pacific ocean floor and found distinctive rocks formed when the Pacific tectonic plate changed direction and began to plunge under the Philippine Sea Plate about 50 million years ago.

  • Climate study finds evidence of global shift in the 1980s

    Planet Earth experienced a global climate shift in the late 1980s on an unprecedented scale, fueled by anthropogenic warming and a volcanic eruption, according to new research. Scientists say that a major step change, or 'regime shift,' in Earth's biophysical systems, from the upper atmosphere to the depths of the ocean and from the Arctic to Antarctica, was centered around 1987, and was sparked by the El Chichón volcanic eruption in Mexico five years earlier.

  • Liquid acoustics half way to the earth's core

    Scientists have succeeded in measuring the speed of sound in mixtures of liquid iron and carbon in extreme conditions, allowing limits to be set on the composition of the Earth's core.

  • Dinosaur extinction theory: New research may draw 'curtain of fire' on theories

    The role volcanic activity played in mass extinction events in Earth's early history is likely to have been much less severe than previously thought, according to a study.

  • Stretchy slabs found in the deep Earth

    A new study suggests that the common belief that the Earth's rigid tectonic plates stay strong when they slide under another plate, known as subduction, may not be universal.

  • Earth not due for a geomagnetic flip in the near future

    According to a new study, the Earth's geomagnetic field is not in danger of flipping anytime soon: The researchers calculated Earth's average, stable field intensity over the last 5 million years, and found that today's intensity is about twice that of the historical average. This indicates that the current field intensity has a long way to fall before reaching an unstable level that would lead to a reversal.

  • Mountain ranges evolve, respond to Earth's climate, study shows

    Erosion caused by glaciation during ice ages can, in the right circumstances, wear down mountains faster than plate tectonics can build them, groundbreaking new research has shown.

  • Whiffs from cyanobacteria likely responsible for Earth's oxygen

    Earth's oxygen-rich atmosphere emerged in whiffs from a kind of cyanobacteria in shallow oceans around 2.5 billion years ago, according to new research.

  • Half of all Amazonian tree species may face extinction

    Scientists report that more than half the tree species in the Amazonian rainforest may be globally threatened. However, the study also suggests that Amazonian parks, reserves, and indigenous territories, if properly managed, will protect most of the threatened species.

  • Climate change: Warm water is mixing up life in the Arctic

    The warming of arctic waters in the wake of climate change is likely to produce radical changes in the marine habitats of the High North. This is indicated by data from long-term observations in the Fram Strait.

  • Stormy space weather puts equatorial regions' power at risk

    Stormy space weather sweeping across the equator is threatening vital power grids in regions long considered safe from such events, ground-breaking new research reveals.

  • Ancient fossil forest unearthed in Arctic Norway

    Ancient fossil forests have beenunearthed in Arctic Norway, thought to be partly responsible for one of the most dramatic shifts in the Earth's climate in the past 400 million years.

  • Low-oxygen 'dead zones' in North Pacific linked to past ocean-warming events

    A new study has found a link between abrupt ocean warming at the end of the last ice age and the sudden onset of low-oxygen, or hypoxic conditions that led to vast marine dead zones.