The Radford University Forensic Science Institute (RUFSI) is an interdisciplinary institute whose goal is to promote and support forensic science education, research, and public service. The institute faculty are comprised of specialists in Forensic Anthropology and Forensic Archaeology.  The FSI mission is to serve as a center for innovative interdisciplinary forensic science research and to provide, with integrity, the highest quality educational training, consultation, and public service in the forensic sciences.  Its faculty also provide objective and unbiased court testimony in regard to medicolegal death cases in the Commonwealth and beyond. Learn more.

Science Daily: Forensic News

  • Why water splashes: New theory reveals secrets

    The reason why raindrops and spilled coffee splash has been revealed by scientists. The new theory uncovers – for first time – what happens in space between liquid drop and surface to cause splash. A microscopic layer of air – 50 times smaller than a human hair – trapped between liquid and surface can prevent liquid spreading on surface. In their new report, scientists compare the scale of this 1cm layer of air stopping a tsunami wave spreading across a beach.

  • Bright 'glow stick' marker for cells

    Any child who has played with a glowstick or captured a firefly understands the wonder of chemiluminescence, or chemical light. This process is already used to detect blood at crime scenes and to determine the concentrations of different components of biological samples. Researchers introduce a new chemiluminescent probe that is better for use in water and up to 3,000 times brighter than previous probes.

  • Porous crystalline materials: Researcher shows method for controlled growth

    Porous crystals called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) consist of metallic intersections with organic molecules as connecting elements. Thanks to their high porosity, MOFs have an extremely large surface area. A teaspoonful of MOFs has the same surface area as a football pitch. These countless pores situated in an extremely small space offer room for “guests” and can, for example, be used for gas storage or as “molecular gate” for separation of chemicals, explain scientists.

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News and Upcoming Events

  • Dr. Cliff Boyd was recently honored for his 30 years of outstanding contributions in Archaeology at the    Annual Uplands Archaeology in the East Symposium XII held at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina, Feb. 24 – 26, 2017.
  • Research entitled “Comparability of Macroscopic, Microscopic, and Radiologically Defined Pediatric Antemortem Healing Stages” (by Drs. C. Boyd, D. Boyd, S. Roller, D. Foley) received the Ellis R. Kerley award for Outstanding Research in Forensic Anthropology at the 68th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences for 2016-2017.
  • Dr. Donna Boyd was recently selected as Secretary of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Forensic Anthropology as well as the American Standards Board, Anthropology Group, of the American Academy of Forensic Anthropology.

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